Skip to content
Home » Spiritual Meaning Of Shittah Tree

Spiritual Meaning Of Shittah Tree

The shittah tree (or shittim as it is sometimes called) was an important tree to the Israelites because it was used to build their tabernacle and other things. The word “shittah” comes from a Hebrew word that means “thick” or “solid.” This refers to how dense and sturdy this large evergreen tree is. It grows 20-30 feet tall with dark green leaves that are about 4 inches long, oval in shape and slightly serrated along the edges. It has clusters of small white flowers at its base which eventually become berries that turn from green through shades of red before ripening into black..

A shittah tree A depiction of Ark of the Covenant. In the Exodus, the ancient Israelites were commanded to use “shittah wood” to make various parts of the Tabernacle and of the Ark of the Covenant.

Spiritual Meaning Of Shittah Tree

In the Old Testament, Ezekiel 31:3 describes the Shittah Tree as being “planted” by God himself. A tree of uncertain identity but probably an acacia (such as Acacia seyal) from the wood of which the ark and fittings of the Hebrew tabernacle were made.

In Islam, the Shittah Tree represents sacrifice, which is an important part of many religious practices.

The shittah tree is a species of acacia that grows in Israel in the Sinai and Negev desert regions.

The bark of the shittah tree is light brown or olive green in color and smooth on young trees but becomes rough and scaly on older trees. The inner bark is soft and yellowish in color; it gives off a pleasant odor when broken or bruised.

Shittim wood has been sought out since ancient times for its unique properties and symbolism.

Shittim wood has been sought out since ancient times for its unique properties and symbolism.

The shittim tree is associated with the Egyptian goddess Hathor. She was thought to live in the tree, which was known as the “House of Hathor”. Shittim wood was also one of the materials used to make her sistrum—an ancient musical instrument similar to a tambourine or rattle that was used in religious ceremonies such as those honoring Isis at Abydos temple on Egypt’s west bank near Luxor

The Bible mentions that Moses and Aaron used the wood of the shittah tree to build their tabernacle, making it a highly revered resource.

The Bible mentions that Moses and Aaron used the wood of the shittah tree to build their tabernacle, making it a highly revered resource.

In the Bible, the shittah tree is associated with many key events, including being used as a symbol of prosperity when God told Abram to plant a grove of trees.

In the Bible, the shittah tree is associated with many key events, including being used as a symbol of prosperity when God told Abram to plant a grove of trees.

In Jewish tradition, one of the names for God is “Shittim,” which comes from the Hebrew word for “acacia.” This name refers to both an event and a specific tree that was used during this event (which was described as having occurred on Mount Sinai).

The Shittah Tree is an iconic symbol in Jewish history that has also been associated with many pivotal events in Christianity.

The name Shittah means “the place where God rested” or “the place where judgment was made.” In the book of Genesis, it is said that when Cain murdered his brother Abel, he was marked with a sign so that no one would kill him: “And now you are cursed from the earth which has opened her mouth to receive your brother’s blood from your hand…When you cultivate it [the ground], it will not yield its strength again until you release its power” (Gen 4:11-12).

Shittim wood images

Shittim wood is the wood from the acacia tree, which is native to the Mediterranean region. The Bible mentions this type of wood in reference to many items, such as the Ark of the Covenant (Exodus 25:10), Solomon’s Temple (1 Kings 6:15), and furniture for King Ahaziah (2 Kings 8:17). Some believe that shittim wood was used for these objects because it was rare and therefore associated with wealth and prestige.

All of our products are handcrafted from shittim wood.

The shittim wood we use for our products is a type of fragrant cedar. This wood has been used in the Holy Land for ages to build furniture, fences and houses.

The shittim tree was known in ancient times as “the tree of life.” In fact, it’s mentioned several times in the Bible—most notably by Solomon when he built the Temple in Jerusalem:

“The cedars in Lebanon which He planted;* The trees of Bashan* which His fingers fashioned.” (Psalms 92:12)

Hand crafted from shittim wood.

This hand crafted, traditional Shittim wood is the most durable and stable wood to use in the making of shofars. It comes from trees that are at least 100 years old. The bark is removed with a special machine and then sanded smooth before being polished to a high sheen. These shofars have been made by second generation craftsmen who have been working with this material for over 30 years. The small holes on each side of the horn are an ancient tradition which serve no purpose but make your shofar more attractive!

Opening the Ark of the Covenant, contained the Ten Commandments engraved on two stone tablets.

The ark of the covenant was a box or chest made of shittim wood. Inside, the ark contained a pot filled with manna and Aaron’s rod that budded. The ark also contained two stone tablets that had been inscribed with the Ten Commandments by God himself. When Moses placed his hands on top of these tablets, it produced a bright light that could be seen for miles around.

The rest of this article is below:

The Ark was made from the wood of a tree called Shittim or Acacia wood.

The Ark was made from the wood of a tree called Shittim or Acacia wood. The exact type of tree used is unknown, but it was most likely an African acacia (or one of its close relatives).

The Hebrew word for Shittim is אָכַלְתּוּס (“okay-tuss”). It’s often translated as “acacia” in English, but it literally means “thorns.”

The Hebrew word for wood that would have been used to make the Ark is בֶּן־אוּר (ben-ur) which literally means “son of light.” The name refers to its ability to withstand heat and sunlight without burning up like other woods would do if exposed directly to them over time – hence why Shittim was chosen as the right material for constructing such an important object as Noah’s ark!

The Ark contained manna and Aaron’s rod, which miraculously budded.

The second item that the Ark contained was manna. Manna was a food that God provided for the Israelites during their 40 years in the desert between leaving Egypt and arriving at Mount Sinai. It was a small, white, round substance that tasted like wafers made with honey.

Aaron’s rod also miraculously budded and flowered while inside the Ark (Num 17:10).

Throughout their forty years of wandering in the desert, the ark went before them as they followed Jehovah’s directions for where to pitch camp.

Throughout their forty years of wandering in the desert, the ark went before them as they followed Jehovah’s directions for where to pitch camp.

The Levites carried it on their shoulders as they traveled from place to place (Num. 4:5).

Each month, one family of Kohathites was appointed to carry it by a cart or wagon (Num. 7:9-10).

When the Israelites crossed over into Canaan, the priests and Levites transported it on carts (1 Chron. 15:2).

When the children of Israel crossed the Jordan River into Canaan (The Promised Land) they carried with them an image contained within a box made of shittim-wood. This image had been carved by Bezalel according to God’s instructions to Moses. It represented God’s presence with His people.

You can imagine the importance of keeping this box in good condition.

When the children of Israel crossed the Jordan River into Canaan (The Promised Land) they carried with them an image contained within a box made of shittim-wood. This image had been carved by Bezalel according to God’s instructions to Moses. It represented God’s presence with His people, who were now settling in their new land. The Bible tells us that when Aaron died and his son Eleazar became head priest, he took care of the Ark and kept it safe from enemy attack by placing it within a tent called “Ohel Moed.” The Ark was never outside those walls for long periods during that time period until King David moved it into Jerusalem where it remained until Solomon built a special home for it on Mount Moriah (Temple Mount).

According to the Bible, Shittim Wood symbolizes regeneration and cleansing. It is referenced in Exodus 25 as one of the materials used to build the Tabernacle and its furniture. This same material was later used in Solomon’s Temple (1 Kings 6:7 & 15).

In the Bible, Shittim Wood symbolizes regeneration and cleansing. It is referenced in Exodus 25 as one of the materials used to build the Tabernacle and its furniture. This same material was later used in Solomon’s Temple (1 Kings 6:7 & 15).

Shittim Wood represents purity and holiness, which makes it a fitting choice for building sacred spaces like churches or temples.

Shittim wood symbolizes regeneration, cleansing and holiness.

Shittim wood symbolizes regeneration, cleansing and holiness. It is referenced in Exodus 25 as one of the materials used to build the Tabernacle and its furniture. This same material was later used in Solomon’s Temple (1 Kings 6:7 & 15).

The shittim wood is a real wood that grows on trees and has been known since ancient times. The tree produces small white flowers with yellow centers, which produce berries that are ripe from May through July. When burned, they give off an aroma similar to orange blossoms—that’s where we get our idea for “frankincense.”

Significance of Shittim in the Bible

Shittim is a large area in the plains of Moab directly across from Jericho, immediately east of the Jordan and north of the Dead Sea. Shittim is significant in Israel’s history because it is the site of the last encampment of the nation at the end of the wilderness wanderings just before crossing the Jordan into the Promised Land.

Israel remained at Shittim for a long time before traversing into Canaan. While at Shittim, the episode involving Balaam and his donkey occurred. King Balak of Moab hired Balaam, a pagan seer, to curse the people of God and prevent them from entering Canaan. Instead, Balak ended up blessing the nation of Israel (Numbers 22 — 24).

In Shittim, the Israelites were enticed into idolatrous Baal worship and immoral sexual relations with Moabite and Midianite women. Angered by their unfaithfulness, the Lord sent a plague on the men of Israel, killing twenty-four thousand of them (Numbers 25).

At Shittim, in preparation for entering Canaan, a tribe-by-tribe census was taken of all the men ready for battle (Numbers 26). It was here that the Israelites defeated the Midianites from their headquarters at Shittim (Numbers 31). In Shittim, Moses delivered his farewell speech and final blessing to the people (Deuteronomy 31 — 33). At Shittim, Joshua was declared Moses’ successor (Deuteronomy 31:14–29; 34:9). Joshua sent two men secretly from Shittim as spies to scout out Jericho (Joshua 2:1).

The miraculous journey crossing through the Jordan River with the ark of the covenant began in Shittim (Joshua 3:1) and ended in Gilgal (4:19). The event was remembered in the book of Micah: “My people, remember . . . your journey from Shittim to Gilgal, that you may know the righteous acts of the LORD” (Micah 6:5).

Shittim is a transliteration of the Hebrew word for “acacia trees.” The location was likely named for its great number of acacias. An alternate name for this area is Abel-Shittim, which means “meadow [or stream] of the acacias.” The shortened version is used more frequently in the Bible.

The “Valley of Shittim” or “Valley of Acacias” mentioned in a prophetic vision in the book of Joel is a region that receives water from a spring in the temple: “And in that day the mountains shall drip sweet wine, and the hills shall flow with milk, and all the streambeds of Judah shall flow with water; and a fountain shall come forth from the house of the LORD and water the Valley of Shittim” (Joel 3:18, ESV).

The exact location of the Valley of Shittim is unknown. Most scholars place it in a different location than the encampment site east of the Jordan. Since the water in Joel’s prophecy flows from the temple in Jerusalem, this valley would seem to be west of the Jordan. The Wadi en-Nar at the lower end of the Kidron Valley is a possibility. That portion of the valley runs through a dry wilderness to the Dead Sea, where acacias trees grow in abundance.

Many scholars consider the reference to the Valley of Shittim in Joel to be symbolic and not an actual geographical location. Joel was figuratively announcing that the water of life, the gospel of grace, would bring newness of life to a desolate and dying world. In this Messianic picture, Christ Himself is the fountain who “shall come forth from the house of the LORD and water the Valley of Shittim.” The flowing streams of living water will reach far and wide, flowing to the Gentiles and to the most remote regions of the world. God’s grace is an overflowing fountain that will never run dry.

Conclusion

Shittim wood is a great symbol for cleansing, regeneration and holiness. It’s perfect for making beautiful pieces of furniture that will last through generations.

The shittah tree has a rich and powerful spiritual meaning. The Torah teaches us that the shittah tree was chosen by God as the first plant to grow on dry land after the great flood. In fact, this was one of only two trees that survived Noah’s flood! So when you see a shittah tree growing in your garden or neighborhood, it’s like seeing an old friend who brings good memories with them wherever they go.