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Praise And Worship Songs By Black Artists

Praise and worship songs by black artists has grown into its own brand in the urban contemporary music scene. Due to this genre’s increase in popularity, we’ve compiled a list of praise and worship songs that are performed by artists of African descent.

Praise and worship songs by black artists, also known as gospel (Christian music) songs are typically accompanied by guitars and drums. Fans of gospel music are called gospel music listeners. The genre’s performers typically emphasize the Christian aspect of their music, although some perform it as a “crossover” style to appeal to fans of secular pop music.

Right here on Churchgists, you are privy to a litany of relevant information on Praise and worship songs by black artists, and so much more. Take out time to visit our catalog for more information on similar topics.

Praise And Worship Songs By Black Artists

This article is about praise and worship songs by black artists. We have provided the lyrics for 6 gospel music tracks. The songs are popular among church goers in the country. They are “Be Thou My Vision” by Richard Smallwood, “Oh Happy Day” by The Edwin Hawkins Singers, “Holy Is The Lord” by Selah, “There Is None Like You” by Israel Houghton and many more.

Praise and worship songs by black artists are a genre of music that has long been overlooked by the mainstream music industry.

While most praise and worship songs by black artists are about God, there is also a strong tradition of secular praise and worship songs by black artists that have been recorded since the 1950s.

Some well-known examples of praise and worship songs by black artists include “Gotta Have Faith” by Marvin Gaye, “I Will Always Love You” by Whitney Houston (a tribute to God), “Praise Him” by Donnie McClurkin, and “Jesus Is My Everything” by Kirk Franklin (who also recorded “The Blood”).

Old Black Gospel Songs List

Many popular contemporary gospel singers are also known for their work in hip hop or R&B music, such as Mary Mary (whose single “Shackles (Praise You)” was nominated for a Grammy Award in 2005), Tamela Mann (whose single “Take Me To The King” reached number one on Billboard’s Hot Gospel Songs chart), Yolanda Adams (who has won four Grammy Awards), Kirk Franklin (who has won six Grammy Awards), CeCe Winans (who has won two Grammy Awards), and Marvin Sapp (who has won one Grammy Award).

Praise and worship songs by black artists have long been a staple of the gospel music industry. They serve as an important reminder that even in the face of adversity, we can always turn to God for strength and guidance.

Here are five of our favorite praise and worship songs by black artists:

“Glory to God” by Kirk Franklin

This song was originally released in 2004 on Kirk Franklin’s album The Fight of My Life. The song was written by Kirk Franklin and Robert Jones Jr., and it reached number one on Billboard’s Hot Gospel Songs chart.

“I Love You Lord” by Donny Hathaway

Donny Hathaway released this song on his album Everything Is Everything in 1970. It was written by Donny Hathaway, who also performs lead vocals on the track. The song features background vocals from Roberta Flack, who is best known for her 1972 hit “Killing Me Softly With His Song.”

“My Tribute (To God Be The Glory)” by Marvin Sapp

Marvin Sapp released this song as a single from his 2003 album What You Never Know. It was written by Marvin Sapp, along with Tommy Sims and Rebecca Cox-Alford

Praise and worship songs by black artists

The Storm is Passing Over (Charles Albert Tindley)

The Storm is Passing Over, by Charles Albert Tindley, is a song written in 1902 as a response to the 1901 fire that destroyed most of the city of Galveston, Texas. The lyrics reflect on the devastation and loss caused by the storm and calls upon God for mercy.

The first person to perform this song was Rev. J. W. Walker in December 1903 at the Christian Church in New York City.

The song has been recorded by many artists over time including: Bill Gaither, Edwin Hawkins Singers and The Clark Sisters among others.

What a Friend We Have in Jesus (Joseph Scriven, Charles Crozat Converse)

What a Friend We Have in Jesus (Joseph Scriven, Charles Crozat Converse)

This hymn was written in 1885 by Joseph Scriven and Charles Crozat Converse. The lyrics are simple and uplifting, with many praising the Lord through the metaphor of friendship. It has been used as a song for children’s services and youth camps throughout history, but it is also popular among adults who find encouragement from its message.

There Is Power in the Blood (Lewis E. Jones)

There Is Power in the Blood was written by Lewis E. Jones in 1898. The song has been recorded by several artists over the years, including: Bill & Gloria Gaither and the Gaither Vocal Band; Elvis Presley; Sandi Patti; Billy Graham and other gospel music artists.

The chorus goes like this: “There is power, pow’r, pow’r in the blood of Jesus / There is power, pow’r, pow’r in the blood of Jesus / ‘Tis a cleansing stream that makes me whole / Power everywhere when we speak His name.”

The Nail Scarred Hand (Rev. G.T. Rowe, Jr.)

The Nail Scarred Hand is a song by Rev. G.T. Rowe, Jr., written in 1967 and recorded on his first album that same year. Born in New Orleans, Louisiana, Rev. Rowe was an ordained minister with the Church of God in Christ who wrote over 200 hymns during his lifetime (he passed away from cancer at age 72). The Nail Scarred Hand is one such hymn that reflects upon Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection—the central tenets of Christianity—and declares them to be true through the words of the lyrics.

His Eye is On the Sparrow (Civilla D. Martin, Charles Gabriel)

This song was written in 1905, when the composer and lyricist were having a conversation about a sick friend. Civilla D. Martin asked Charles Gabriel why he wasn’t worried that the woman would die, and he replied: “She knows that God watches over all creatures.” Though the original lyrics are not religious (Martin’s version focuses on how God watches over birds), many versions use religious language to describe God as “Heavenly Father” or “King of Kings.” Over 125 artists have recorded this tune since its creation, including Elvis Presley in 1955 and Johnny Cash in 1965.

Oh How I Love Jesus (Frederick Whitfield, Frederick Whitfield)

Oh How I Love Jesus (Frederick Whitfield, Frederick Whitfield)

Oh, how I love Jesus,

All his teaching and ways;

Jesus is sweetest name,

Hallelujah! Hallelujah! Hallelujah!

I’ll praise His name forevermore.

Take My Life and Let It Be (Frances Ridley Havergal)

Take my life and let it be,

Consecrated, Lord, to Thee;

Take my moments and my days,

Let them flow in ceaseless praise.

He Keeps Me Singing (Luther B. Bridgers)

The song “He Keeps Me Singing” is a testiment to the power of music. It’s about the joy of living, even when things are hard, and it was written by Luther B. Bridgers, a black man in 1851. Although it is old and has been recorded by many artists over the years (including Sting), this song is still popular today because it speaks so well to people who feel alone or forgotten by others in their lives. The lyrics state: “When my world falls apart around me/ He keeps me singing/ When I have no strength left inside me/ He keeps me singing.” This song shows us that even when we feel like there’s nothing left for us on earth—no reason to go on—we can always find hope and joy in God Almighty!

This song shows us that even when we feel like there’s nothing left for us on earth–no reason to go on–we can always find hope and joy in God Almighty!

I Surrender All (Judson Van DeVenter, Winfield S. Weeden)

I Surrender All (Judson Van DeVenter, Winfield S. Weeden)

Music by: Judson Van DeVenter and Winfield S. Weeden

Lyrics by: Judson Van DeVenter and Winfield S. Weeden

First published in 1904

First recorded in 1904

Performed for the first time at the Chicago Auditorium on October 29, 1908 by the Baptist Temple Choir

My Hope is Built on Nothing Less (Edward Mote, William Bradbury)

My Hope is Built on Nothing Less

My hope is built on nothing less

Than Jesus’ blood and righteousness;

I dare not trust the sweetest frame,

But wholly lean on Jesus’ name.

Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword? As it is written: For Your sake we are killed all day long; We are accounted as sheep for the slaughter. Nay, in all these things we are more than conquerors through Him who loved us. For I am persuaded that neither death nor life, nor angels nor principalities nor powers (of darkness) , nor things present nor things to come , Nor height nor depth , nor any other created thing can separate us from the love of God which is in Christ Jesus our Lord .

There are many great hymns that have been written by black artists

  • “Amazing Grace” by John Newton
  • “Take My Hand, Precious Lord” by Thomas A. Dorsey
  • “How Great Thou Art” by Stuart K. Hine
  • “Down at the Cross” by James Cleveland, William McDowell and Paul Smith

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