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Most Quoted Psalms In The New Testament

The most quoted psalm in the New Testament is probably Psalm 146:7, “The Lord guards his people; he remembers to show mercy to his land.” The apostles often quoted it as a prayer for protection and grace when they wrote about various individuals.

For this reason, Psalm 110 is “the most frequently quoted or referenced psalm in the New Testament”.

This is my favorite verse and I try to go back to it often. This is where God’s love is revealed to us in Jesus Christ. He is our Mediator, and intercessor- one who speaks on our behalf before God and provides full relief from the guilt of sin once Jesus has compassed it.

When my father was dying of cancer, he turned to the 23rd Psalm. He liked to quote it. I can still hear him saying “Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me.” As a child, I thought it was just a nice thing people said when they were dying and didn’t want to scare you. But now that I am older and have faced a few challenges of my own, including the death of my father but also others…I understand what he meant. That psalm gave him something to hold on to as he faced his own mortality.

It should not come as a surprise that Jesus Christ used many quotes from this psalm during his crucifixion because it describes so clearly what He was going through in such an accurate way. Even if we have not been crucified ourselves or had our hands and feet pierced with nails, we can all relate to these words because many of us at some time in our lives have felt abandoned by God or even betrayed by Him. And yet as we read these words from scripture – whether it be during happy or sad times – we are reminded that God is always there for us no matter what happens and nothing can separate us from His love for us (Romans 8:38-39).

Psalm 22 (23 LXX) is the most quoted psalm in the New Testament.

And the most quoted psalm in the New Testament is Psalm 22 (23 LXX). It is quoted or alluded to in Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. It is also quoted in Hebrews 2:12 and Revelation 1:17.

Six words from Psalm 22 – including its opening line – are used in each of the gospels to describe Jesus on the cross.

Psalm 22 is often referred to as the “Crucifixion Psalm,” and for good reason. Six words from Psalm 22 – including its opening line – are used in each of the gospels to describe Jesus on the cross.

Jesus was mocked and ridiculed: “He trusts God, let God deliver him now if he wants him!” (Luke 23:35). Jesus was silent and not responding to the crowd: “I am thirsty” (John 19:28). Jesus was abandoned by God: “My God, my God why have you forsaken me?” (Matthew 27:46). Jesus was thirsty (“…and cried out again with a loud voice ‘I thirst'”) (John 19:28). Jesus was forsaken (“My God my God why have you forsaken me?”) (Matthew 27:46). And finally, Joseph of Arimathea pierced his side with his spear after he died (John 19:34-37)

In addition to describing the experience of Jesus on the cross, this psalm also forecasts His resurrection.

Psalm 22 is quoted in the gospels, Hebrews, Romans, 1 Corinthians, 2 Corinthians and Galatians. A quick read of these books makes it clear that Psalm 22 was a personal prayer of Jesus Christ on the cross:

  • In Mark 15:34-36 we find this quote right after Jesus died: “And at the ninth hour Jesus cried out in a loud voice, ‘Eloi, Eloi lama sabachthani?’ which means ‘My God, My God why have you forsaken me?’ When some of those standing near heard this they said ‘Listen! He’s calling Elijah.’ One of them ran and filled a sponge with sour wine put it on a stick and offered it to him to drink but the others said ‘Leave Him alone! Let us see if Elijah comes to save Him.’ Then Jesus uttered another loud cry and breathed His last.” The same quote appears again in Matthew 27:46-50 where we are told that some bystanders misunderstood what happened to Jesus’ body when they saw it being moved from the cross. They thought he had come back from death into life again just as prophets like Elijah had done before him (2 Kings 2:11).

Much of the second half of the psalm is quoted in Hebrews 2:12.

Hebrews 2:12-13 is a quotation from Psalm 22. Psalm 22 is quoted in Hebrews 2:12-13. Part of what makes this such an important psalm is that it’s quoted so often in the New Testament—it’s mentioned by name five times (Hebrews 2:12, Romans 15:3; 1 Peter 2:6; Isaiah 53 and Acts 8), and other verses are alluded to as well.

We see God’s faithfulness even through trials in ways we have not experienced before.

We see God’s faithfulness even through trials in ways we have not experienced before.

God works all things for our good (Romans 8:28). It is easy to lose sight of this in the midst of hardships, but God’s Word assures us that He will not leave us or forsake us (Hebrews 13:5). If we were to ask Him what His plans are for our lives, He would tell us that they are good plans (Jeremiah 29:11). Often they may seem bad at first glance because we don’t understand why they are happening; however, when viewed as part of God’s perfect plan, they can be seen as wonderful.

When you take the time to examine your situation and look at it through the lens of faith rather than despair and hopelessness, you will find hope rising within you once again.

Conclusion

In Psalm 22, we see God’s faithfulness even through trials in ways we have not experienced before. In that way, this psalm is still relevant today. We see God’s faithfulness to us when we are abandoned by those closest to us or our world is turned upside down. We see God’s faithfulness to send His Son to save us from our sins. And we see God’s faithfulness in the resurrection of Jesus.