Esv Bible With Apocrypha

The ESV Bible with Apocrypha includes all the canonical books of the Old and New Testaments. The Apocrypha (or Deutero-canonical Books) are those books that appear in Roman Catholic and Orthodox Bibles, but not in Protestant ones.

The Esv Bible includes the most accurate, up-to-date text of the New Testament available today. The Old Testament is translated from Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek into contemporary English. The irresistible design combines the beauty and readability of chunky black type on cream-colored pages bound in a flexible hardcover that lies flat when open for personal study or teaching.

esv holy bible with apocrypha anglicized deluxe leatherette edition

Anglican Liturgy Press is blessed to offer to Anglicans in the United States and Canada this Anglican Edition of the English Standard Version of the Bible (ESV) with Apocrypha.

Why ESV

The ESV Bible is based on the premise that the words of the Bible are the very words of God. As a word-for-word (or essentially literal) translation, the ESV seeks to express the deepest nuance of meaning and power in the original Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek of the Bible – and thus to bring the reader as close as possible to the timeless truth, beauty, and depth of meaning of the original languages. Since its publication in 2001, the ESV Bible has gained wide acceptance in numerous denominations (including the Roman Catholic Church in India) as well as millions of individuals around the world.

Renowned Anglican theologian Dr. J.I.Packer, General Editor of the ESV Bible and Theological Editor of the ESV Study Bible, and ACNA Archbishop Emeritus Robert W. Duncan, prepared the Prefaces and Introductions to the Anglican Liturgy Press edition of the Bible and Apocrypha

Why Apocrypha

As stated more fully in Article VI of the Articles of Religion, the Apocrypha is not part of the canonical Scriptures of the Holy Bible; therefore, it has been included in a separate section following the Old Testament and the New Testament. This ESV translation of the Apocrypha stands in the mainstream of classic Apocrypha translations extending back over the last five centuries.

The lectionaries of most editions of the Book of Common Prayer since 1549 include canticles and readings from the Apocrypha at Morning and Evening Prayer, as does the Book of Common Prayer 2019 of the Anglican Church in North America.

Article VI states that the fourteen ancient books of the Apocrypha are read “for example of life and instruction of manners; but…not (to) apply them to establish any doctrine.” The Apocrypha is primarily an aid for reading the Daily Offices, for instruction in living, and for lectionary readings in the Church.

FOREWORD TO THE ANGLICAN LITURGY PRESS EDITION
The Apocrypha is not, strictly speaking, part of the canonical Scriptures of the Holy Bible. That is why it has been included here in a separate section following the Old Testament and the New Testament. As stated in the Anglican Thirty-nine Articles of Religion, the fourteen ancient books of the Apocrypha are read “for example of life and instruction of manners; but . . . not [to] apply them to establish any doctrine.” As stated fully in Article VI:

Holy Scripture containeth all things necessary to salvation: so that whatsoever is not read therein, nor may be proved thereby, is not to be required of any man, that it should be believed as an article of the Faith, or be thought requisite or necessary to salvation. In the name of the Holy Scripture we do understand those canonical Books of the Old and New Testament, of whose authority was never any doubt in the Church. [Here the 39 canonical books of the Old Testament are listed.] And the other Books [The Apocrypha] the Church doth read for example of life and instruction of manners; but yet doth it not apply them to establish any doctrine. [Here the books of the Apocrypha are listed.] All the books of the New Testament, as they are commonly received, we do receive, and account them Canonical.

The Lectionaries of the Church of England Book of Common Prayer of 1549, 1552, 1559, 1604, and 1662, together with the Episcopal Church Book of Common Prayer of 1789, 1892, 1928, and 1979, and the Anglican Church of Canada Book of Common Prayer of 1918 and 1962, all include canticles and readings from the Apocrypha. Although Anglicanism draws from the Apocryphal books for the Lectionary of the Church, such readings generally occur only in the Morning and Evening Prayer readings rather than the Eucharistic readings.

The Apocrypha, therefore, is included with this Anglican Edition of the English Standard Version of the Bible (ESV) primarily as an aid for reading the Daily Offices, for instruction in living, and for Lectionary readings in the Church.

PREFACE TO THE ANGLICAN LITURGY PRESS EDITION
This translation of the Apocrypha stands within the mainstream of classic Apocrypha translations extending back over the last five centuries. The present translation is an adaptation of the ESV with Apocrypha published in cooperation with Oxford University Press in 2009, which took the 1971 Revised Standard Version (RSV) Apocrypha and the 1977 Revised Standard Version (RSV) Expanded Apocrypha as its starting point.

Like the English Standard Version (ESV) itself, the ESV Apocrypha has been translated in an essentially literal way, which seeks to provide a word-for-word and phrase-byphrase translation of the original text that is both accurate in substance and dignified in expression.

The word Apocrypha means “hidden.” This refers to the distinction that Christians have made between the 39 books of the Old Testament and the writings of the Apocrypha, the origin of which is not fully known (i.e., “hidden”). Until the sixteenth century, many, if not most, Christians accepted some of the Apocrypha as part of the Bible. In any case, the Apocrypha was generally regarded as worthy of reading for spiritual enrichment. Most Protestant churches eventually decided not to include the Apocrypha in the Bible, mainly because these books do not exist in their entirety in Hebrew or Aramaic, but also for doctrinal reasons. Many Anglicans, Lutherans, and other Protestants continue to affirm the spiritual value of reading the Apocrypha. The books of the Apocrypha are collected here in the back of the Bible and reproduced in slightly smaller type than the canonical books of the ESV Old Testament and New Testament, in order to reflect the Apocrypha’s less authoritative status within the Anglican Church in North America.

We are pleased to offer this version of the Apocrypha to all those readers who wish to explore these ancient writings, which provide additional insight into the history and thought of the Jewish people during the centuries before the birth of Jesus Christ.

This edition of the ESV is completely Anglicized and features the full Apocrypha. Presented in a double-column format, with explanatory footnotes providing alternative renderings of particular words and phrases, the ESV Bible with Apocrypha offers a clear, easy-to-read text that is perfect for everyday use.

The ESV Bible is an excellent version for detailed Bible study, but one that also possesses a beauty, clarity and dignity of style that makes it superbly suitable for private devotion or for reading aloud during public worship.

esv study bible with apocrypha

This edition features a beautifully designed black hardback binding, inlaid with silver foil, with a matching silver ribbon marker to help you keep track of your Bible study. It also makes a wonderful gift for friends and loved ones on special occasions.

Other features include:
9.5 pt font size
An award-winning typeface
Inline chapter headings
Inline chapter numbers
12 maps
White paper from sustainable sources

The English Standard Version is an essentially literal translation of the Bible that seeks as far as possible to reproduce the precise wording of the original text and the personal style of each biblical writer.

Following a distinct word-for-word translation method, the ESV Bible captures the precise wording of the original texts by rendering each Hebrew or Greek word with an equivalent English word. This result is a modern translation that stands in the classic tradition that starts with the King James Version of 1611 and stretches through to the Revised Standard Version of 1971.

Since the publication of the ESV back in 2001, many have clamored for a Catholic edition or at least one that included the Apocrypha/Deuterocanonicals books. It was almost ten years ago that Oxford published an edition with the Apocrypha/Deuterocanonicals but that soon went out of print. This first attempt was appreciated by many, even though it had some issues of ghosting and extremely thin paper. Yet, it was great to have it as an option and it opened up the possibility of future editions. Now, with an actual ESV-CE in print (but not available in North America), some are waiting for it to be published here. Until then, there is a solid option available right now, at the reasonable price of $21.95 from Anglican Liturgy Press.

Coming in at around 6.5X9.5 inches in size and 1274 pages, the ESV w/Apocrypha can serve either as your new favorite ESV or the perfect temporary ESV edition until the ESV-CE gets a US publishing date. The ESV w/Apocrypha is a solidly made bible, even with its unfortunate glued binding. It is advertised as a “pew edition” with a black cover and gold foil stamping. In my hand, it does have the feel of the typical parish hymnal. Compared to the earlier Oxford Edition, it is far more readable in my mind, with a clearer type, more space in the margins, and better paper. Ghosting is far less a problem with this edition. At the bottom of each page you will find textual notes, alternate renderings, and direct Old Testament quotes cross-referenced as found in the New Testament. The only thing missing, in comparison to the Oxford, are a set of Bible maps.

The Apocrypha is placed after the New Testament, much like the Oxford. They are arranged according to canon, with Tobit through 2 Maccabees being first, followed by 1 Esdras to 4 Maccabees. What you will immediately notice is that the entire Apocrypha section is a font smaller than the rest of the Bible, indicating the lesser importance given by Anglicans to them. This is all explained in the Apocrypha Preface, specifically citing from the Church of England’s 39 Articles of Religion. According to the publisher: “Anglican theologian Dr. J.I.Packer, General Editor of the ESV Bible and Theological Editor of the ESV Study Bible, and ACNA Archbishop Emeritus Robert W. Duncan, prepared the Prefaces and Introductions to the Bible and the Apocrypha.” Personally, I doesn’t bother me that the text is presented in that way, though a few might object.

Overall, I think this is an upgrade to the Oxford edition, with my only caveat being the fact that the binding is glued. If the ESV is on your wishlist, this might serve you well until something better comes out. If you are looking to just have a basic ESV w/Apocrypha for reference, this might be the perfect edition for you.

On a personal note, I am curious what the appeal is for Catholics concerning the ESV. Perhaps that question is for another post, but I have read large portions of the ESV and I just don’t see how it is in any way superior to either the RSV (in any edition) or the NRSV. I would love to hear from those who admire the ESV in the comments, along with any questions or thoughts concerning this edition.

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