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the lost books of the bible the great rejected texts pdf

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The Lost Books of The Bible is a history of early Christianity. It is a story of the great lost books and New Testament writings that have been lost through the centuries.The author, Frank Joseph, is considered one of the foremost authorities on religious topics and biblical research. This book contains rare manuscripts that were denied canonization and as a result were denounced by early Church fathers such as Jerome, who said that he would rather see every library destroyed than keep their works available to Christians.

Churchgist will give you all you ask on the lost books of the bible the real apocrypha, why were the lost books of the bible removed and so much more.

the lost books of the bible the great rejected texts pdf

1 Lost Books of the Bible: The Great Rejected Texts Joseph B. Lumpkin Click here if your download doesn”t start automatically

2 Lost Books of the Bible: The Great Rejected Texts Joseph B. Lumpkin Lost Books of the Bible: The Great Rejected Texts Joseph B. Lumpkin The Lost Books of the Bible: The Great Rejected Texts – Eighteen of the most sought after books available, which shed light on the evolution of our faith, our theology, and our church. Translations and commentary by the author of the best selling book, “The Lost Books of Enoch,” Joseph Lumpkin. – Section One: Lost Scriptures of the Old Testament- First Book of Adam and Eve, Second Book of Adam and Eve, First Book of Enoch, Second Book of Enoch (Secrets of Enoch), Jubilees, Jasher, The Story of Ahikar – Section Two: Apocalyptic Writings and the End of Days- Apocalypse of Abraham, Apocalypse of Thomas 4 Ezra, 2 Baruch, War Scroll (Sons of Dark vs. Sons of Light) – Section Three: Lost Scriptures of the New Testament- Gospel of Philip, Gospel of Mary Magdalene, Apocryphon of John, Gospel of Thomas, Gospel of Judas, Acts Chapter 29 Download Lost Books of the Bible: The Great Rejected Texts…pdf Read Online Lost Books of the Bible: The Great Rejected Text…pdf

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the lost books of the bible the real apocrypha

The Lost Books of the Bible and the Forgotten Books of Eden (1926) is a collection of 17th-century and 18th-century English translations of some Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and New Testament apocrypha, some of which were assembled in the 1820s, and then republished with the current title in 1926.


History of the translations
Rutherford Hayes Platt, in the preface to his 1964

reprint of The Lost Books of the Bible and the Forgotten Books of Eden states:
“First issued in 1926, this is the most popular collection of apocryphal and pseudepigraphal literature ever published.”
The translations were first published, under this title, by an unknown editor in The Lost Books of the Bible Cleveland 1926, but the translations had previously been published many times.

The book is, essentially, a combined reprint of earlier works. The first half, Lost Books of the Bible, is an unimproved reprint of a book published by William Hone in 1820, titled The Apocryphal New Testament, itself a reprint of a translation of the Apostolic Fathers done in 1693 by William Wake, who later became the Archbishop of Canterbury, and a smattering of medieval embellishments on the New Testament, from a book by Jeremiah Jones (1693–1724), posthumously published in 1736. In the three centuries since these were originally published, a great deal more is known about the Apostolic Fathers (including a good deal of the original text that was not available in 1693) and New Testament apocrypha.

The second half of the book, The Forgotten Books of Eden, includes a translation originally published in 1882 of the “First and Second Books of Adam and Eve”, translated first from ancient Ethiopic to German by Ernest Trumpp and then into English by Solomon Caesar Malan, and a number of items of Old Testament pseudepigrapha, such as reprinted in the second volume of R.H. Charles’s Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha of the Old Testament (Oxford, 1913).

More modern translations of these works include J. H. Charlesworth, ed. Old Testament Pseudepigrapha; W. Schneemelcher, ed. New Testament Apocrypha; and M. R. James, The Apocryphal New Testament.

Past of The Lost Books of the Bible
♦ = attributed to the Apostolic Fathers

The Protevangelion
The Gospel of the Infancy of Jesus Christ
The Infancy Gospel of Thomas
The Epistles of Jesus Christ and Abgarus King of Edessa
The Gospel of Nicodemus (Acts of Pilate)
The Apostles’ Creed (throughout history)
The Epistle of Paul the Apostle to the Laodiceans
The Epistles of Paul the Apostle to Seneca, with Seneca’s to Paul
The Acts of Paul and Thecla
♦ The Epistles of Clement (The First and Second Epistles of Clement to the Corinthians)
♦ The Epistle of Barnabas
♦ The Epistle of Ignatius to the Ephesians
♦ The Epistle of Ignatius to the Magnesians
♦ The Epistle of Ignatius to the Trallians
♦ The Epistle of Ignatius to the Romans
♦ The Epistle of Ignatius to the Philadelphians
♦ The Epistle of Ignatius to the Smyrneans
♦ The Epistle of Ignatius to Polycarp
♦ The Shepherd of Hermas (Visions, Commands, and Similitudes)
Letter of Herod To Pilate the Governor
Letter of Pilate to Herod
The Lost Gospel of Peter
♦ The Epistle of Polycarp to the Philippians
Contents of The Forgotten Books of Eden
The Conflict of Adam and Eve with Satan (The First and Second Book of Adam and Eve)
The Secrets of Enoch (also known as the Slavonic Enoch or Second Enoch)
The Psalms of Solomon
The Odes of Solomon
The Letter of Aristeas
The Fourth Book of Maccabees
The Story of Ahikar
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs

  1. Books of the Apocrypha:

First and Second Esdras (150-100 BC)

Tobit (200 BC)

Judith (150 BC)

Additions to Esther (140-130 BC)

Wisdom of Solomon (30 BC)

Ecclesiasticus, otherwise known as The Wisdom of Jesus son of Sirach (132 BC)

Baruch (150-50 BC)

Letter of Jeremiah (300-100 BC)

Song of the Three Holy Children, an addition in the Greek version of Daniel 3 (170-160 BC)

Susanna (200-0 BC)

Bel and the Dragon (100 BC)

Additions to Daniel, or the Prayer of Azariah (200-0 BC)

Prayer of Manasseh (100-0 BC)

First Maccabees (110 BC)

Second Maccabees (110-170 BC)

  1. Books of the Pseudepigrapha:

Epistle of Barnabas

First (and Second) Epistle of Clement to the Corinthians

The letter of the Smyrnaeans (also known as The Martyrdom of Polycarp)

The Shepherd of Hermas

The Book of Enoch

The Gospel of Judas (130-170 AD)

The Gospel of Thomas (140-170 AD)

The Psalms of Solomon

The Odes of Solomon

The Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs

Second Baruch

The Books of Adam and Eve

The Acts of Phillip

The Apocalypse of Peter

The Gospel of the Nativity of Mary

The Gospel of Nicodemus

The Gospel of the Saviour’s Infancy

The History of Joseph the Carpenter

The Acts of Paul (Including Paul and Thecla)

The Seven Epistles of Ignatius

The Epistle of Polycarp to the Philippians

why were the lost books of the bible removed

I believe you are talking about the so-called Apocrypha. That term refers to books that were written in Greek within the Jewish community in the centuries before Christ. Those books are distinct from the Old Testament because they were written in Greek, not Hebrew, and they are distinct from the New Testament because they were written before Christ came, not after. So there is already something about them that sets them apart as different from the books that all Christians accept as inspired Scripture.

Nevertheless, after lengthy discussion and debate in the few centuries after Christ, regional councils in the western part of the Roman Empire, at Hipppo in 393 and Carthage in 397, approved adding these books to the canon of Scripture, as long as this decision was ratified by the central authority in Rome.

No action was taken in that regard for over 1,000 years. But finally, in 1546, the Council of Trent, largely in response to the way Martin Luther had separated out these apocryphal books and placed them between the testaments in his German translation of Bible, decreed that they were as fully canonical as the others. Nevertheless, the Roman Catholic church still describes these books as deuterocanonical, meaning that they belong to a second group of books “whose Scriptural character was contested in some quarters,” as opposed to the protocanonical books, the collection of “sacred writings which have been always received by Christendom without dispute.”

The Council of Trent also decreed that the Vulgate was the authoritative text of Scripture. That actually sent something of a mixed message about the Apocrypha, because St. Jerome’s prologues were always included in the Vulgate, and in his prologue to the book of Kings, in which he surveyed the entire Old Testament, he specified that the books that had been translated from Greek, rather than from Hebrew, are “set aside among the apocrypha” (inter apocrifa seponendum) and “are not in the canon” (non sunt in canone). He made similar comments in the prologues to several of the apocryphal books themselves. So while the Roman Catholic Church’s embrace of these books is explicit, its position on them is not without internal tensions.

Eastern Orthodox Bibles include all the books in the Catholic Apocrypha along with several more. However, it classifies all these apocryphal books as Anagignoskomena (“worthy to be read”), meaning that they are read during services of worship, but that they are not as authoritative as the other books. Orthodox theologians sometimes call the apocryphal books deuterocanonical to indicate their secondary authority, using this term differently from Catholics, for whom it describes how these books were received after first being disputed.

And Protestants, ever since Martin Luther, have not considered the Apocrypha canonical, except for Protestants in the Anglican/Episcopalian tradition.

So maybe the real question is not why some books were removed from the Bible, but why some books that were different from both the Old Testament and the New Testament were added to the Bible. The answer is that, as the Eastern Orthodox say, they are “worthy to be read.” They provide important information about what happened in the years between the testaments, they tell inspiring stories of how people remained faithful to God during difficult trials in those times, and they add to the collection of wise advice for living that is found in the canonical wisdom books.

So it is certainly not a sin to read them. Even Protestants, who do not consider them to be inspired Scripture, say that they are edifying, meaning that reading them can strengthen our faith and devotion to God. As a Protestant myself, I do not have these apocryphal books in the Bibles that I use regularly for study and devotions. But I do have copies of these books in some other Bibles that I own. I have read the apocryphal books and gotten a lot out of them.

I hope this provides you with some helpful background to the issue. As I said, it would certainly not be a sin to read those books, and I think they would help you learn some useful things if you did read them. If you belong to a community of Christians, and if this issue is important within that community, you could explain to anyone you told about reading the books that you were not reading them as Scripture, but as edifying literature that has come down to us from within the tradition of our faith. I hope no one would be upset about that.

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