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Short Black History Skits for Church

Looking for Short Black History Skits for Church? You’re in the right place! Below is a list of some of the best free black history skits for high school and elementary students. The most important thing to remember is that these are all printable, which means you can use them multiple times if needed. The full script to our free black history skits is below. Or you can print out the pages with an outline of the information, which will save you a lot of time and effort.

African-Americans who have made significant contributions to society are celebrated throughout the month of February as part of Black History Month. African American families share a strong sense of religion, family values, and the history and culture of their people, which can serve as a focal point for church activities. A general sense of pride is what fuels the month-long festive mood in the churches.

Churchgists.com is a blog that contains various educational activities, articles and other resources. Our purpose is to inform and empower people. We do this through engaging content and using a variety of formats including videos, articles and product reviews. We love black history as much as you do!

Short Black History Skits for Church

The black history skits in this article are designed to help teachers, parents and children learn more about black history. I hope these free printable black history skits inspire your students and help them understand the meaning of Thanksgiving, Black History Month and Howard University!

Are you looking for free short black history skits? Check out our collection of black history plays, skits, and songs that can be used in classrooms, churches, schools and other places where historical events are taught. These worksheets cover a broad range of events in an entertaining manner. History skits are an excellent way to encourage your congregation when it’s time to learn about black history. You can even use them as a party game during black history month!

Short Black History Skits for Church

In many churches, Black History Month is a time to celebrate the rich history and contributions of African Americans to society. One popular way to educate and entertain church members during this month is through short skits that highlight key moments and figures in black history. These skits are not only engaging and informative but also provide an opportunity for church members to reflect on the struggles and triumphs of the black community.

Harriet Tubman Skit

One popular skit that is often performed in churches is about the life of Harriet Tubman, a prominent figure in the abolitionist movement and a conductor on the Underground Railroad. The skit usually portrays her daring escapes to freedom and her efforts to help others find liberty. This skit is a powerful reminder of Tubman’s bravery and commitment to justice and freedom.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Skit

Another popular skit is about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., a leader in the civil rights movement known for his message of nonviolent resistance. This skit often includes excerpts from his famous speeches, such as “I Have a Dream”, and highlights his commitment to equality and justice for all. It serves as a tribute to Dr. King’s legacy and encourages church members to continue his work for social change.

Rosa Parks Skit

A skit about Rosa Parks, known as the “Mother of the Civil Rights Movement,” can also be a powerful addition to a Black History Month program. This skit usually depicts her brave refusal to give up her seat on a segregated bus and explores the impact of her actions on the civil rights movement. It serves as a reminder of the importance of standing up against injustice and the power of individual acts of courage.

Relevant Points:
  • Short skits can be an engaging and educational way to celebrate Black History Month in churches.
  • Skits about key figures in black history, such as Harriet Tubman, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and Rosa Parks, can help church members learn about their contributions to society.
  • These skits can also inspire reflection on the ongoing struggles for justice and equality in today’s society.

 

Funny Short⁣ Black ‌history Skits for Church

Church skits are a great way to entertain and educate congregations, and what better way to do so than with funny short Black history skits? These skits can bring humor, culture, and a message of empowerment to the church community. Here are some hilarious skit ideas that can be used in church settings:

1. “Harriet Tubman’s Underground Railroad Adventure”: This skit features Harriet Tubman leading a group of church members on a journey through the church building, pretending it’s the Underground Railroad. As they navigate through obstacles and challenges, they learn about Tubman’s bravery and determination in helping slaves to freedom. This skit can be both funny and educational, showcasing Tubman’s incredible story.

2. “Martin Luther King Jr.’s Dream”: In this skit, church members portray various characters from the Civil Rights movement, including Martin Luther King Jr. himself. Through humorous interactions and dialogue, they reenact King’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech, highlighting the importance of equality and justice. This skit can be a powerful reminder of King’s legacy and the ongoing fight for civil rights.

3. “Hidden Figures: The Untold Story”: This skit pays tribute to the contributions of Black women mathematicians at NASA during the space race. Church members can act out scenes depicting the challenges these women faced and the impact of their work on history. Through comedy and drama, this skit sheds light on a lesser-known aspect of Black history and celebrates the achievements of these trailblazing women.

4. “The Black Inventors Showcase”: In this skit, church members take on the roles of famous Black inventors such as George Washington Carver, Garrett Morgan, and Madame C.J. Walker. Through witty banter and creative demonstrations, they showcase the inventions and discoveries that have shaped our world. This skit can be both entertaining and enlightening, highlighting the ingenuity and resilience of Black inventors throughout history.

By incorporating these funny short Black history skits into church programming, congregations can celebrate Black culture, honor the achievements of Black historical figures, and spark important conversations about diversity and inclusion. These skits can entertain audiences of all ages while also serving as a powerful reminder of the ongoing journey towards equality and justice.

As the Bible teaches us in Galatians 3:28, “There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is no male and female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus.” Through these skits, we can come together as a church community to celebrate the diversity and strength of God’s children, regardless of race or background.

So next time you’re looking for a creative and entertaining way to explore Black history in the church, consider incorporating these funny skits into your programming. They can bring laughter, inspiration, and important lessons to your congregation, creating meaningful connections and fostering a spirit of unity and love.

How to Plan Play Skits for Black History

Title: Celebrating Black History Through Skit Performances

One impactful way to celebrate Black History is through the performance of skits that showcase important events, individuals, and achievements in African American history. Skits allow for creative expression and can help educate and inspire audiences of all ages about the rich cultural heritage of the black community.



Importance of Skit Performances:

Skit performances can bring history to life in a memorable and engaging way. They can help individuals connect with and better understand the struggles and triumphs of the African American community throughout history. By incorporating skits into Black History Month celebrations or educational programs, we can ensure that these important stories are passed down from generation to generation.Benefits of Skit Performances:

  • Engage audience members in a fun and interactive way

  • Bring history to life through dramatic reenactments

  • Educate individuals about important events and figures in African American history

  • Inspire creativity and storytelling skills

  • Themes for Skit Performances:

    When planning skits for Black History, it’s important to choose themes that highlight significant contributions and milestones in African American history. Some popular themes include:


    Theme Description
    Harlem Renaissance Explore the cultural and artistic movement of the 1920s that brought about a flourishing of African American arts and music.
    Civil Rights Movement Dramatize key events and individuals who fought for equality and justice during the Civil Rights era.
    Black Inventors and Innovators Showcase the groundbreaking contributions of African American inventors and pioneers in various fields.


    Tips for Creating Skits:
  • Research historical events and figures to ensure accuracy

  • Create engaging storylines and dialogue that capture the essence of the time period

  • Select talented actors who can bring characters to life with passion and authenticity

  • Incorporate music, costumes, and props to enhance the storytelling experience


  • Conclusion:

    By performing skits that celebrate Black History, we can pay tribute to the achievements and resilience of the African American community. Skits provide a powerful platform for storytelling and education, allowing us to honor the past while also looking towards a brighter future of equality and unity.

    Free Printable Black History Skits

    1.Call to Worship – Drama
    In order to worship the Lord in their own ways and styles, a group of slaves briefly hid themselves in the dense forest, far from the ears of their plantation masters. But, one young girl wonders “What has God done for us?” when asked why they should even meet to praise. She learns about the significance of this “church” and the fact that no matter what it appears to the outer world to be on the inside, God may set her free via the words and music (optional) of the others. Topics include African History, worship in the era of slavery, and praise in bad times. 10 characters. 5 to 8 minutes long more details $10.00
    (purchase)

    

    2.Color My World – Comedy
    Jen and Casey are two young people who believe that playing games like “tag” and “red rover” with just two other people isn’t all that entertaining. They are happy to hear that more kids are coming to play, but when they see them, they quickly alter their minds. One boy has a green face, another has brilliant blue eye shadow, a girl is bright pink with feathers in her hair, two youngsters have cone-shaped heads, and one of them is orange! Jen and Casey conclude there is no way they can play with these folks because of their “strange” combination. “They don’t seem normal,” Nevertheless, the kids start to view their new pals in a completely new perspective when an adult buddy explains that God made us all different for a reason and that being different isn’t necessarily a negative thing. They start to realize the distinctiveness of each of God’s creations and that “In our hearts, we are not all that dissimilar. All of us share the same needs and desires.” This humorous sketch makes the point that all diversity is a part of God’s plan and that you shouldn’t always judge individuals by their outward appearance. Topics include diversity, Black History, the idea that everyone is important and unique, how people are alike and different, and bullying of others due to differences. 9 characters 5 to 8 minutes long more details $10.00Add to cart
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    3.Color My World at School – Comedy
    Jen and Casey are two young people who believe that playing games like “tag” and “red rover” with just two other people isn’t all that entertaining. They are happy to hear that more kids are coming to play, but when they see them, they quickly alter their minds. One boy has a green face, another has brilliant blue eye shadow, a girl is bright pink with feathers in her hair, two youngsters have cone-shaped heads, and one of them is orange! Jen and Casey conclude there is no way they can play with these folks because of their “strange” combination. “They don’t seem normal,” The children, however, start to view their new pals in a completely new light when an adult friend explains that we are all built differently for a reason and that being different isn’t necessarily a negative thing. They start to learn about one other’s differences and realize that “In our hearts, we are not all that dissimilar. All of us share the same needs and desires.” This humorous sketch makes the point that everyone’s differences are a part of the “larger picture” and that you shouldn’t always judge individuals by their outward appearance. Topics include diversity, Black History, the idea that everyone is important and unique, how people are alike and different, and bullying of others due to differences. 9 characters 5 to 8 minutes long more details $10.00Add to cart
    (purchase)

    

    4.Dreams Begin with Dreamers – Comedy/Drama
    “Those who trust in the beauty of their dreams own the future.” Eliza Roosevelt In this sketch, renowned African Americans discuss how they overcame the adage “You can’t” and achieved their goals. People like Mohammed Ali, Sidney Poitier, George Washington Carver, and Madame CJ Walker all came from modest backgrounds and shared a same dream: to improve their lives and pursue their hobbies. Martin Luther King Jr.’s aspirations paved the way for the likes of Whitney Houston, Michael Jackson, and Mae Jemison (the first black woman in space), among others. There is no hope without dreams. This performance pushes the audience to imagine their own aspirations and see them through to completion by using the lives of individuals who have already been discussed to demonstrate how each person’s dreams came true and the influence they had on our world today.Themes: Black History; dreaming big; fulfilling your dreams; how the people in history paved the way for the futureCharacters: 17Length: 8-10 minutesmore info$10.00
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    5.Fulfillment – Drama
    While sipping on a nice cup of coffee, Barack and Michelle Obama are thinking back on their election to the White House. The subject of Martin Luther King Jr. and how he and his wife contributed to their success is brought up. Barack makes a sincere remark about how he wishes Dr. King were still alive to see how far this country has progressed. Obama and Michelle immediately pass out in response to Martin and Coretta King entering the room with a loud “Poof!” When the president and first lady “come to,” they start a dialogue with the Kings and describe how important they were to their ascent to the White House. Martin is overjoyed to learn that Barack and Michelle Obama are realizing his lifelong desire, and he is also glad to realize that Barack has his own dream. The Obamas meet the Kings, Martin Luther and Coretta King’s accomplishments, how the Kings helped African Americans—including Barack and Michelle Obama—achieve their goals, how Barack Obama realized Martin Luther’s dream, and what the Obamas and the Kings might discuss. 4 characters 5-8 minutes more information $10.00Add to cart
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    Free Black History Plays For Church

    Black history plays are a great way to teach your elementary school students about black history. Their performance will delight, inspire and educate them.

    1. ‘Snow White – So White’

    Available for use for free, “Snow White – So White” tells the story of Moses, Miriam and Aaron with a special twist–it emphasizes the importance of race and that God made everyone equally. This skit is a good way to start a lesson in a Sunday School class or a children’s sermon (see Resources).

    2. Galatians 3:26

    With a group of students or adults, discuss aspects of black history from slavery to the Civil Rights Movement. Pinpoint specific instances in black history you might want to highlight, such as the freeing of the slaves, stories slaves may have told or the famous arrest of Rosa Parks. Collaborate and make the event into a skit. Incorporate scripture about how all are one in Christ, such as Galatians 3:26: “For ye are all the children of God by faith in Christ Jesus. For as many of you as have been baptized into Christ have put on Christ. There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither bond nor free, there is neither male nor female: for ye are all one in Christ Jesus. And if ye be Christ’s, then are ye Abraham’s seed, and heirs according to the promise.”

    3. Christian Playwright

    If you want something more professional, you can hire a Christian playwright to write a script to your taste or browse a professional’s website, where you can buy plays you think will resonate with your congregation (see Resources).

    4. Call to Worship – Drama


    The slaves have hidden themselves away in the woods, far from the eyes and ears of the plantation owners, so that they may worship God in privacy. One young girl, however, questions the point of their worship, asking, “What has God done for us?” She learns from the others’ words and music (optional) the significance of this “church,” and she realizes that despite its outward appearances, God can set her free from her sins.

    Themes: Black History; worship during slavery times; worship/praise during times of hardship
    Characters: 10 Length: 5-8 minutes
    more info

    5. Color My World at School – Comedy


    Jen and Casey are two youngsters who find playing games with just two people isn’t that much fun, especially games like “tag” and “red rover.” They are thrilled to hear more kids are on their way to play, however, they change their tune once they see them: one boy has a green face, another wears bright blue eye shadow, a girl is bright pink and has feathers in place of hair, and two kids have heads in the shape of a cone, not to mention one of them is orange! With such a “weird” mix, Jen and Casey decide there’s no way they can play with these people. “They’re not normal!” But when an adult friend points out that we are all made differently for a reason and that being different isn’t necessarily a bad thing, the kids begin to see their new-found friends in a whole new light. They begin to explore the uniqueness of each other, as well as discover that “deep down we’re really not all that different. We all have the same needs and wants.” Told with humor, this skit points out that diversity is all a part of the “big picture,” and that you can’t always judge people by what’s on the outside.

    Themes: Diversity; Black History; each person is unique and special; how people are alike; how people are different; picking on others because they are different
    Characters: 9 Length: 5-8 minutes
    more info

    Black History Month Skits and Readers Theater Plays Bundle

    Free Black History Skits for Elementary Students

    Our free black history skits for elementary students are the perfect tool for teachers to introduce the need for celebrating Black History Month. Teachers can choose from a variety of skits, including excerpts from iconic performances such as The Wiz and To Kill a Mockingbird.

    1.Generations – Drama
    The skit opens in the year 1685, where we find an African American mother and daughter cleaning and folding clothes.  The daughter poses the question to her mother, “Haven’t you ever dreamed of being free?” This sparks a short dialogue with the mother telling her daughter not to even speak of things such as that.  The daughter is told that slavery has become their way of life and that it will never change, dashing any hopes the daughter may have for herself, her children or her grandchildren to ever be free.  The skit then switches to the narrator who briefly tells of the 13th Amendment and how in 1865 slavery was abolished.  The skit highlights various topics throughout history–freedom and slavery, being able to vote, go to college, act in movies or t.v. etc.  At each interval the characters are told “It will never happen.”  The voice of the narrator then tells how each one of those things did eventually happen, highlighting the various people in history who made the events a reality.Themes: Changes in Black history over the years, how far the African American culture has come over the years, the idea that African Americans had very little rights or opportunities many years ago, but now are free to do anything they desire and have many opportunities before them. spotlight on several important black history makersCharacters: 6Length: 5-8 minutesmore info$10.00
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    2.Going Under – Drama
    When Franklin, a slave, is beaten for a minor incident and then set to be sold and separated from his family, he enlists the help of a “Conductor” in the Underground Railroad to help them all escape.  Along the journey, we meet people like Harriet Tubman, who helped over 70 slaves escape in her lifetime, and William Still, who was born free and was educated just as any white man.  While the story is told in “real time” (the audience watches the story unfold) a Narrator helps fill in small tidbits of information in appropriate places.  This skit reminds us all of the wickedness and perils of slavery and then the awe and inspiration that comes with freedom. Themes: Black History, The Underground Railroad, Slavery, Freedom, Harriet Tubman, William StillCharacters: 7Length: 8-10 minutesmore info$10.00
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    3.Hair We Go Again – Comedy
    When Sarah Breedlove’s hair starts falling out and developing red, flaky patches, she decides to develop a new hair care formula, which was given to her in a dream.  She doesn’t think it sounds too crazy but her sister Louvinia (Lou) and her husband, Charles Walker, aren’t so sure.  Arguing that Sarah can barely read and knows nothing about hair products, Lou and Charles try to dissuade her.  However, Sarah doesn’t give up that easily.  She knows she was given the hair formula for a reason and figures if she can change her name to something that sounds more official, people will listen to her and buy her products.  In the end, she says goodbye to Sarah Breedlove and hello to Madam C.J. Walker.  And the rest, as they say, is history.Themes: Black History; Madam C.J. Walker; Black inventorsCharacters: 3Length: 4-5 minutesmore info$7.00
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    4I Have a Dream – Drama
    What if Martin Luther King had the choice to decline his destiny?  This skit reinforces the large contribution Martin Luther made to American history by toying with the idea that after discovering what happens to his future self, he may choose an alternate life.  It all begins with a simple prayer of what direction his life should take.  Immediately, the forces of Good and Evil are on the case.  Evil shows up to try to convince Martin that his young death was tragic and could have been avoided if he had chosen another path. At the same time, Good points out the world would not be the same without his involvement and contribution, and that even though his death, while tragic, was for the greater good of mankind.  In the end, Martin must choose his destiny.  Evil says, “It only takes one wrong decision,”  but Good, knowing the character of Martin Luther King is confident he will choose wisely.   Themes: Martin Luther King, the accomplishments Martin Luther King made in history, what if Martin Luther had not chosen to fulfill his destiny, how life would have been different if Martin Luther had not been a leader in our nationCharacters: 3Length: 5-8 minutesmore info$10.00
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    5.Invention Connection – Comedy
    Keesha and Marcus are siblings who both have presentations to do.  Marcus wants to focus on famous African American athletes but Keesha thinks that subject has been “done to death!” She thinks her topic of “black inventors” is much more interesting but Marcus thinks it’s “Borrring!”  So, with the help of her new computer and the very attractive search engine, Hot Bot, Keesha sets out to prove that the world would not be the same without these courageous and intelligent inventors.  Appearances made by: George Washington Carver (peanuts & more), John Standard (refrigerator), Alice Parker (heating furnace), Frederick Jones (air conditioning), Charles Drew (blood transfusions & blood banks), Daniel Williams (open heart surgery), Henry T. Sampson (gamma electric cell), and Thomas Elkins (the toilet).  Other inventors are also mentioned by name.Themes: Famous black inventors, black history awareness, life would be different without African American influenceCharacters: 11Length: 13-15 minutesmore info$10.00
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    6.Name that Contributor – Comedy
    Rodney and Racine’s mom feels her kids don’t know enough about their African American heritage, which becomes apparent when her son thinks that “heritage” has something to do with “hair extensions.”   So, Mom creates a plan to help Rodney and Racine “study”  by bringing in four friends to help her out. Mom tells the kids that each person represents an important contributor to Black History.  Each person then gives various clues about his or her self, and if Rodney and Racine can correctly guess the name of each person, they can earn various prizes, such as extra dessert, a bonus in their allowance or no chores for the week.  But things don’t look good for Rodney when he think’s one of Alex Hailey’s famous book characters was George Bush. Important contributors mentioned in this skit are Alex Hailey, Sojourner Truth, Bille Holiday, and Booker T. Washington. 
    Themes: Black History; famous contributors to Black History; African American heritage; historical figures; Alex Hailey; Sojourner Truth; Billie Holiday; Booker T. WashingtonCharacters: 7Length: 8-10 minutesmore info$10.00
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    7.Night Watch – Drama
    On New Year’s Eve, 1863, a group of young people gather inside a church to pray and speculate as to whether or not President Lincoln will sign the much anticipated Emancipation Proclamation.  While three of the teens are hopeful, three are not. Towards the end of the skit, an appearance is made by President Abraham Lincoln himself, giving a short narration on the details of his afternoon, leading up to signing this very important piece of historical documentation. Themes: Black History, Abraham Lincoln and the Emancipation ProclamationCharacters: 8Length: 5-8 minutesmore info$10.00
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    8.Peanut Gallery – Comedy
    Mrs. K wants to do something a little different with her class, so she sends them on a scavenger hunt to find clues about peanuts and the “Father of the Peanut Industry,” George Washington Carver.Themes: George Washington Carver; peanuts; Black HistoryCharacters: 10Length: 8-10 minutesmore info$10.00
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    9.Persevere – Comedy/Drama
    President Obama is feeling down: his health care reform hasn’t gone as he had hoped and his approval rating is low.  While talking with First Lady, Michelle, Barack begins to question whether or not he should have ever run for a second term.  On some days, he would like to go back to being a “normal” person again. Michelle tries to convince him that change takes time and that he is exactly where he needs to be right now.  Unconvinced, Michelle wishes that Nelson Mandela and Martin Luther King Jr. were here to talk some sense into her husband.  After all, she tells Barack, “where would the world be today if they had given up during hard times?” Suddenly, Nelson Mandela and Martin Luther King Jr. are standing in the same room, causing Mr & Mrs Obama to faint.  When the President comes to, he embarks on a conversation about perseverance and fighting for what you believe in, with two of history’s greatest leaders. This skit is about hope in the face of struggle, and standing up to fight for what is right, no matter what current situation you are in. Themes: Black History; President Obama; Martin Luther King Jr.; Nelson Mandela; persevering through difficult timesCharacters: 4Length: 5-8 minutesmore info$10.00
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    11.Reminiscing – Monologue
    Three famous African American icons of yesterday and today (Ella Fitzgerald, Jesse Owens, Oprah Winfrey) take the stage one at a time.  In three brief monologues, each character reflects on the struggles and accomplishments of his/her life.  At the end of each monologue, the character asks “Who Am I?”, encouraging audience participation if desired.  If no audience participation is desired, the character identifies his/her self and exits the stage.  When all three monologues have been completed, a fourth character, Morgan Freeman, takes the stage and briefly re-emphasizes the notion that “those who came before have paved the way for those of today.”  Names such as Martin Luther King Jr., Harriet Tubman, Malcolm X, Rosa Parker etc. are briefly mentioned. Themes: Black History; Ella Fitzgerald; Jesse Owens; Oprah Winfrey; famous African American icons; how past generations paved the way for future generations; how the past influences the present; remembering those who have come before us; African American triviaCharacters: 4Length: 5-8 minutesmore info$10.00
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    12.Symbols of Freedom – Drama
    Various voices in black history share their pieces of the civil rights “puzzle.” Written for elementary age children this simple skit shows how important voices from the past and present have influenced our nation.  Characters include: Harriet Tubman, Malcolm X, Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King Jr., Coretta King, Jesse Jackson, Al Sharpton, Colin Powell, Oprah Winfrey and Barack Obama.Themes: Famous African American people throughout history, the past influencing the present and the future, Black history awareness, heritage, symbols of freedom through historyCharacters: 10Length: 3-5 minutesmore info$7.00
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    13.The Future is History – Comedy
    When Eli catches his sister and her friend in an African American inspired dance, he and his buddies think the girls have lost their minds. But through innocent teasing and a “know it all attitude,” the boys soon learn they didn’t know as much about their own heritage as they think they did.  The girls end up teaching them a history lesson they won’t soon forget!Themes: Black history awareness, other cultures, heritage, the past influencing the present and the future, famous African American people throughout history, studying other cultures or your own heritage can be funCharacters: 5Length: 5-10 minutesmore info$10.00
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    14.The Seat of her Pants – Comedy
    When it comes to writing about black historical figures, Shondra has an edge: her grandmother knew Rosa Parks.  It came as no surprise then, when Shondra and her friend, Jackie were asked to write about an event in black history, they chose the story of Rosa Parks refusing to give up her seat to a white man on a bus.  Themes: Rosa Parks, black history, civil rights, segregationCharacters: 12Length: 8-10 minutesmore info$10.00
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    15.The Witnesses – Drama
    April 4, 1968 was a tragic and historic day in our history, marking the end of Martin Luther King Jr’s life.  Told through the eyes of the witnesses who were there on the day he died, this skit depicts the humanity of one of our country’s greatest leaders. Plagued with death threats, bomb scares and even a physical stabbing, Dr. King often contemplated giving up his dream for a more “normal” life.  He even predicted he would not live to see his 40th birthday. See what took place on that fateful day in Memphis as told by the men who were there to witness it: Jesse Jackson, Billy Kyles, Ralph Abernathy, James  Bevel, Andrew Young, and James Orange.  Then see how Dr. King’s dream lives on in each of us, and why Rev. Billy Kyles believes God put him there to witness such a tragic event. 

    Told by using actual events, this skit will transport you to that tragic day in Memphis and give you a glimpse into the real life and death of Martin Luther King Jr. (Includes a brief transcript of the “I’ve Been to the Mountain Top” speech.)Themes: Black History; Martin Luther King Jr DayCharacters: 8Length: 8-10 minutesmore info$10.00
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    16.This Means War – Comedy/Drama
    Teenagers Ike and Jetta are forced to spend some time in a Civil War museum because their parents feel they need to experience more history.  Little did they know, they would soon be experiencing it in a most unusual way, when the statues in the room come to life! Soon, Civil War soldiers and spies are sharing their “war” stories and Ike and Jetta find out what it was really like to be an African American soldier back in the 1800’s.  Stories include those of: Robert Smalls (captain of the steamer ship, the Planter, who escaped to help the Union; Andre Cailloux, the 1st African American war hero who helped change the views of black soldiers; William Carney, who despite being shot 4 times, would not let the American flag fall during battle; Cathy Williams, the first documented African American woman soldier; C-Fed, a conglomeration of all the African American soldiers who fought for the Confederacy; and Harriet Tubman and Mary Elizabeth Bowser, who were spies for the Union.Themes: Black History; Civil War; roles of soldiers in the Civil War; roles of women in the Civil War; conditions for African Americans during the Civil WarCharacters: 9Length: 10-12 minutesmore info$10.00
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    17.Thrill Ride – Comedy/Drama
    A group of kids are sitting around listening to Michael Jackson’s Thriller song, when some friends come in and imply that Michael Jackson is old news and that other entertainers are more current and “hot.” A discussion then ensues about all the contributions Michael made to music and the entertainment industry, as well as the awareness he raised to various causes around the world.  Also, in a fun “spoof” the kids wonder what life would have been like for Michael had he chosen another profession.  For example, as a chef, Michael was asked what he was going to do with the egg he just cracked.  His response?  “Just beat it, beat it, beat it.  Just beat it.” This skit offers a lighthearted look and remembrance of one of our generations greatest entertainers.
    Themes: Black History, Michael Jackson, the impact we have on people’s lives and in the world, humanitarianismCharacters: 8Length: 5-8 minutesmore info$10.00
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    19.Unforgettable O – Comedy
    When Oprah’s staff wants to surprise her with a special “tribute” show, they end up taking a trip down memory lane, remembering highlights from various past shows.  Alhtough a few are ficticious, the majority of the highlights in this skit are real, including references to Tom Cruise (jumping on the couch), Dr. Oz (and the human intestines), Tina Turner (dancing on stage with Oprah), Gayle King (and the adventure road trip), Mary Tyler Moore (showing up to surprise Oprah), Diana Ross (when Oprah dressed up like her), and several others.This is a fun skit teens would enjoy performing, and a simple way to pay tribute to the life work of Oprah. 


    Themes: Black History; Oprah WinfreyCharacters: 12Length: 5-8 minutesmore info$10.00
    Add to cart
    (purchase)

    

    20.Use Me Up – Drama
    “When Oprah Gail Winfrey was born to unwed parents in a samll town in Mississippi, the world didn’t take much notice.  No one could have predicted that a small, poor, black girl would grow up to be one of the richest, most powerful and influential women in history.” And so begins this skit, a tribute to Oprah Winfrey and the contributions to the world she has had made throughout her lifetime.  This skit takes you through 3 “scenes” in Oprah’s life.  The first is when Oprah was 6 years old,  preparing to “preach” in her Grandma’s church.  Though life on the farm with her Grandma was primitive, (there was no running water or electricity) Little Oprah was happy, reading and reciting poetry and scriptures.  But her world is about to change, as she finds out when a teenage version of herself shows up to “warn” her about events to come. It seems that in “not so distant years,” events will change Oprah’s happy childhood into one filled with hurt, anger and rebellion.  “But,” says Teen Oprah, “the darkenss won’t last forever, and you will survive.  Just remember, God is watching over you.” The scene then changes to an angry teenage Oprah who wonders how God could allow such atrocities to happen to her.  Just as she is shouting her wrath at God for abandoning her, an adult version of Oprah in her 50’s appears to tell her not to give up, and that help is on the way–her life is about to change once more.  Adult Oprah shares just a hint of what is on the way for this teen girl, giving her enough courage to face another day:  “One day the sun will shine on you so brightly, you will feel its warmth with you wherever you go.”  The scene changes one last time, as Adult Oprah now comes face to face with the elderly version of herself at age 92.  Just when Oprah thinks she has finally been “used up,” she is informed that even at age 92, there is still work to be done. By Oprah’s own admission, she prayed a prayer at one time in her life:  “God, use me until I’m all used up.”  This skit emphasizes that theme, and in the end, based on the successes and accomplishments Oprah as achieved, ponders the idea, “What would happen in our own lives, and in our world, if we ALL prayed such a prayer?”
    Themes: Black History; Oprah Winfrey; God’s plans for our lives; God can use you no matter what your station in life; Prayer; How one person can make a difference in the worldCharacters: 7Length: 12-15 minutesmore info

    Black History Month Skits And Readers Theater Plays Bundle

    Are you looking for exciting, Black History Month plays that connect with students using pop culture, have a variety of roles for boys and girls, and teach Black history in a way that will wow your audience? You just found them!You’ve Got Options!This bundle includes three plays that explore the accomplishments of Black heroes in history while teaching important themes to students. Use one script for a school assembly, the other for a church event, a youth program, or a summer camp! We add new p

    Subjects: Black History Month, Drama, U.S. History

    Grades: 4th – 6th

    Types:

    Black History Month Skit and Readers Theater Play

    Black History Month Skit And Readers Theater Play

    Are you looking for an exciting, Black history play that connects with students using pop culture, has a variety of roles for boys and girls, and teaches Black history in a way that will wow your audience? You just found it!This short play explores a child’s dream where he/she is visited by African-American heroes such as James Armistead Lafayette, a Revolutionary War spy, and Phillis Wheatley, the first published Black American. These heroes of the past explain how they have inspired and made t

    Subjects: Black History Month, Drama, U.S. History

    Grades: 3rd – 5th

    Types: Frequently assigned in Easel

    Also included in: Black History Month Skits and Readers Theater Plays Bundle

    Add to cart

    Wish List

    Black History Skit: Spotlighting African American Inventors

    Black History Skit: Spotlighting African American Inventors

    by  The Bee-havior Lady

    If you are looking for a skit for your Black History Program, you will love this one. It covers theaccomplishments of African American Inventors. I looked everywhere for skits that my students could perform, and when I came up empty, I wrote my own! Enjoy

    Subjects: Black History Month, Drama

    Grades: 4th – 12th

    Types:

    Black History Month Skit and Readers Theater Play

    Black History Month Skit And Readers Theater Play

    by 

    Rap Opera for Kids

    4.5

    (2)

    $4.00

    • PDF

    Are you looking for an exciting, Black history play that connects with students using pop culture, has a variety of roles for boys and girls, and teaches Black history in a way that will wow your audience? You just found it!This short play explores a child’s dream where he/she is visited by Letitia Woods, historian and the first Black woman to earn a Ph.D. in history at Harvard University. Using her knowledge and books about heroes from the past, she explains how their accomplishments resulted f

    Subjects:

    Black History Month, Drama, U.S. History

    Grades:

    4th – 6th

    Types:

    Add to cart

    Black History Program/ Play/ Skit/ Drama   approx. 40 minutes in duration

    Black History Program/ Play/ Skit/ Drama Approx. 40 Minutes In Duration

    by 

    Awesome Learning Productions

    4.9

    (6)

    $15.95

    • Word Document File

    This play, “Walking in Memphis,” will ‘wow’ an audience as it features the fabulous music and songs written by a host of African Americans! Hit songs that put Memphis music on the map! The script references the talented Tina Turner, Isaac Hayes, BB King, Al Green and several others. The skit is perfect for K-3 students and can easily be adapted for older grades. The dialogue takes the audience back in time to how it all started in Memphis, with W.C. Handy, known as the Father of the Blues, to th

    Subjects:

    Black History Month, Drama, Music

    Grades:

    K – 3rd

    Types:

    Cultural Activities, Songs

    Add to cart

    Black History Month Skit and Readers Theater Play

    Black History Month Skit And Readers Theater Play

    by 

    Rap Opera for Kids

    4.3

    (3)

    $4.00

    • PDF

    Are you looking for an exciting, Black history play that connects with students using pop culture, has a variety of roles for boys and girls, and teaches Black history in a way that will wow your audience? You just found it!This short play explores the efforts of an eleven yeard old to learn about Black youth throughout history who have made an impact on American culture. Through guidance from a parent and the use of technology, the child learns about Ruby Bridges, one of the first children to a

    Subjects:

    Black History Month, Drama, U.S. History

    Grades:

    4th – 6th

    Types:

    Activities, Scripts

    CCSS:

    RF.3.4RF.3.4aRF.3.4bRF.4.4RF.4.4a

    Also included in: Black History Month Skits and Readers Theater Plays Bundle

    Add to cart

    Black History Month Skit

    Black History Month Skit

    by Sandra Matthews Teacher Place

    This is a brief skit that explains the purpose of African American History Month. It is performed by five students.

    Subjects:

    Black History Month

    Grades:

    4th – 8th

    Types:

    Black History Month Celebration Skit Bundle
    Black History Month Celebration Skit Bundle

    Black History Month Celebration Skit Bundle

    by  Desiree McGee-Greene- Literacy Teacher Greatness

    BLACK HISTORY MONTH CELEBRATION SKIT BUNDLEIt’s time to plan, create, and implement an amazing Black History Month Celebration that your students and families will remember for years to come. My Martin Luther King Jr. and Rosa Parks Skit Props will bring your skit to life and get your students even more excited to perform. There are THREE resources included in this bundle:RESOURCE #1: The Rosa Parks Skit Props Include:2 FREE GIFTS: Rosa Parks Skit and Martin Luther King Jr. Skit4 Scene Transitio

    Subjects: Black History Month, Drama, English Language Arts

    Grades:1st – 4th

    Types:

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