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What Is Unleavened Bread In The Bible

“What Is Unleavened Bread In The Bible” refers to a specific type of bread​ mentioned in the Bible that holds symbolic and religious significance. In the⁤ biblical ​context, unleavened bread is intimately linked to the story of the Israelites’ exodus from Egypt, their liberation from⁤ slavery, and the​ establishment of ‌the Passover feast.

Unleavened bread is distinct ‌from regular bread in that it is made without any leavening⁢ agents, such as yeast, baking powder, or baking soda. This means that the bread does not rise and remains flat. This particular characteristic holds deep symbolism, representing haste and urgency.

What Is Unleavened Bread In The Bible

Round, flat cakes of bread made from flour and water without yeast. The ordinary bread of nomadic peoples was unleavened (Hebrew maṣṣâ ), as it still is today in the Near East, and was baked on hot coals or on a grill over an open fire.

Unleavened bread is a type of bread that is made without yeast or any other leavening agent. It is a significant element in the Bible and has been used in various religious contexts. In this blog post, we will explore what unleavened bread symbolizes, its spiritual meaning, and the difference between leavened and unleavened bread in the Bible.

What Does Unleavened Bread Symbolize

Unleavened bread symbolizes purity, humility, and a life free from sin and corruption. In biblical times, yeast was often seen as a symbol of sin or impurity, while unleavened bread represented purity and freedom from sin. The removal of leaven from the home and the eating of unleavened bread during the Passover Feast symbolize the removal of sin from one’s life.

We eat unleavened bread because of something the Lord did—not because we came out of sin, but because of something God did: God released us from our bondage. Whether or not we understand this will determine a great deal about whether we will use His Holy Spirit in the right manner. We must get the horse before the cart. In this case, the horse is God—it is God who did the work; it is God who got us out. The eating of unleavened bread is a memorial of His act.

The eating of unleavened bread directly connects to coming out of sin, but that is not the context in which it first appears. When it is introduced, it is being done because of what God did. Coming out of sin is something we do. In its first appearance, the eating of unleavened bread reflects on what God does, not what we do. The eating of it is a memorial to that.

God intends the keeping of the Days of Unleavened Bread along with the eating of unleavened bread for seven days to remind us of what He has done to bring us out. He made the Israelites go through the literal steps, and we learned the spiritual lesson from them. They went through the steps physically, and we go through the steps spiritually. We will see as we go along how much they actually did in coming out of Egypt, and by comparison, we will see how much we do when we come out of spiritual Egypt. We actually do very little. It is God who frees us, and unleavened bread serves as a reminder of that.

The Days of Unleavened Bread are about overcoming. However, they are primarily about God overcoming Satan, the world, and sin—not so much about us doing it. So, we must see the Days of Unleavened Bread and eating unleavened bread in this context so that we have the proper foundation for rightly observing the festival.

As we consider this analogy, keep this at the forefront of your mind: How much did the Israelites have to do? How much did you have to do to come out of the world?

Looking back, the extent of their participation was enough for them to believe that God was working through Moses. This belief allowed them to obey his commands to prepare the lamb, to keep Passover, to stay in their homes overnight, to gather in Rameses the next day, and to walk out when the signal was given for them to march. How much overcoming of the world, Satan, and sin did they do to accomplish those things? Very little, if any.

When they left Egypt, did they leave sin? The answer to that is, obviously, no. When they got out in the wilderness, they committed one sin after another! No, they did not leave sin. What they did was leave the place of their bondage. Egypt, then, is not a symbol of sin but a symbol of the world.

Spiritual Meaning of Unleavened Bread

Unleavened bread represents purity, humility, and a life free from sin and corruption. It is a symbol of Christ’s sinless life and His sacrifice for humanity. The use of unleavened bread in the Bible symbolizes the world being filled with the glory of Christ’s Resurrection. It also represents sanctification, which means getting the sin out of one’s life.

While the Passover is one of God’s appointed times, it is not listed in Scripture as one of the annual Sabbaths. It is a regular day of work—in fact, it is the preparation day for the first day of Unleavened Bread—but the first few hours, the evening portion of the day, are a significant memorial to two great events in God’s plan for mankind: the death of the firstborn in Egypt and the sacrifice of our Savior, Jesus Christ.

The bulk of the instruction about the Passover is written in Exodus 12, and a great deal of it concerns the Old Testament ritual meal that was eaten that evening. These details are types that were fulfilled in the sacrifice of Jesus Christ, so the New Testament church is no longer required to slay a lamb since, as the apostle Paul writes, “For indeed Christ, our Passover, was sacrificed for us” (I Corinthians 5:7).

The New Testament Passover is modeled after the events that occurred during what is commonly known as the Last Supper, the Passover meal that Jesus ate with His disciples just before His arrest, trial, and crucifixion. Jesus began His instruction that evening with a command to wash one another’s feet: “For I have given you an example, that you should do as I have done to you” (see John 13:1–17), and so we do.

The apostle Paul summarizes what happens next:

For I received from the Lord that which I also delivered to you: that the Lord Jesus on the same night in which He was betrayed took bread; and when He had given thanks, He broke it and said, “Take, eat; this is My body which is broken for you; do this in remembrance of Me.” In the same manner, He also took the cup after supper, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in My blood. This do, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of Me.” (I Corinthians 11:23–25)

So, to commemorate His sacrifice—His broken body and His shed blood—by which He paid the penalty for human sin and consecrated the New Covenant (see Hebrews 9:11–28), Christians eat a little unleavened bread and drink a small amount of wine. In doing so, they acknowledge His sacrifice and rededicate themselves to their covenant with Him. It is clear from both the Old Testament and New Testament examples that only those who have made the covenant—Christ’s disciples—are allowed to partake of the bread and wine, thus only baptized members should participate in this part of the service (see the principle in Exodus 12:43–49; also I Corinthians 11:27–29).

As Christ did after changing the Passover symbols, members of the church then listen to the words of Jesus’ discourse to His disciples, which is found in John 13–17. Then, to close the service, they sing a hymn before concluding the solemn service (see Matthew 26:30; Mark 14:26).

Leavened and Unleavened Bread in the Bible

Leavened bread is prepared with rising agents such as yeast, while unleavened bread is prepared without using any rising agents and is generally flatbread. These two kinds of bread were only used as metaphors in the Christian Bible. The connotations of leavened and unleavened bread can be traced to a particular human organ. In Exodus 12:15, it says: “Seven days you shall eat unleavened bread, but on the first day you shall remove leaven from your houses; for whoever eats anything leavened from the first day until the seventh day, that person shall be cut off from Israel.”

Where did the food they were to prepare and set aside come from? It could not have been manna because manna spoiled within one day (Exodus 16:20). Besides, fresh manna continued to fall each day, except for Sabbaths, until the day following the First Day of Unleavened Bread in that year. God stopped providing manna because the Israelites now had complete access to the produce of the Promised Land, as well as because they were no longer wandering but were camped at a place from which they would launch their conquest of the land.

Considering the time of year (spring), the provision could not have come from fall harvests of fruits and vegetables. The fleeing Canaanites would have either consumed them themselves by this time or taken as much with them as they could. The provision came from a new spring harvest of grains, either winter wheat, barley, or both. There was nothing to stop the Israelites from partaking of what was available because no law of God prohibited it; the offering laws applied only to what Israel had planted.

The command to set aside food was made because God knew He would stop sending the manna on Nisan 16. The stockpiled food would keep Israel fed until a much larger harvest could be made after the Passover events were completed, the holy day observed, and Israel was more settled in the land, preparing for the conquest of Jericho.

Israel crossed the Jordan into the Promised Land on Nisan 10 and immediately moved to set up camp that day in Gilgal. The mass circumcisions mentioned must have taken place on Nisan 11. As Nisan 13 ended and Nisan 14 began, they kept the Passover as commanded by God. The daylight portion of Passover day was spent preparing for the holy day on Nisan 15. They kept the Night to be Much Observed as the holy day began, eating unleavened cakes and parched corn from the already harvested Canaanite crops. During the daylight portion of the holy day, they ate the same provisions that supplied their meal the previous evening because no manna fell on that Sabbath day. No Manna fell the next day, Nisan 16, either.

The notation regarding “old corn” (“produce” in modern versions) is simply given to show where Israel’s sustenance came from, since the manna stopped appearing. It is not given to prove that a wavesheaf offering was made because none was required or could be made in the first place.

Conclusion

In conclusion, unleavened bread is an important element in the Bible that represents purity, humility, and freedom from sin. It has been used in various religious contexts to symbolize different things, such as sanctification and Christ’s sinless life. Leavened bread is prepared with rising agents such as yeast, while unleavened bread is prepared without using any rising agents. Both types of bread were only used as metaphors in the Christian Bible.

I hope this blog post helps you understand more about what unleavened bread means in the Bible.

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